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The Florida Native Plant Society (FNPS) is a non-profit organization formed in 1980 to promote the preservation, conservation, and restoration of the native plants and native plant communities of Florida and the use of Florida native plants in landscaping.

The Dade Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society (DCFNPS) is one of more than 20 chapters around the state and includes residents of Monroe County. More about us »
Next Meeting in Dade County

Next Meeting in Dade County

Tuesday, September 23, 2014, 7:30 p.m.
Pinecrest Gardens, 11000 SW 57 Ave. (Red Road)

Free and open to the public

"Eat Your Veggies Wild!" - Peggy Lantz

People are enjoying the idea of gathering supper from wild plants. It is a delightful hobby, gets you out-of-doors, and adds interesting, delicious, nutritious -- and free -- vegetables to your table. Maybe "weeds" will even seem less of an enemy. Some of the plants that offer foods for humans in south Florida require not the least hint of chill, but many edible wild plants thrive from south Florida to Canada. Peggy Lantz will bring some edible plants to our meeting and share the details of how to identify, when to gather, and how to prepare and cook them. She will also show photos of other edible plants not available at this time of year or in her yard.

Peggy, a Florida native born in Miami, has been gathering wild plants to put on the dinner table for over 50 years. She wrote, with Dick Deuerling, the first little book about Florida's wild edibles, Florida's Incredible Wild Edibles, published by FNPS in 1993. She has also written three other books about Florida nature. She was the first editor of "The Palmetto" and served FNPS for 15 years. She and her husband, Don, live in Orange County west of Orlando on the lake settled and named by her grandfather in 1914.

Upcoming Field Trip

Upcoming Field Trip

Saturday, September 20, 2014 (8:45-noon): Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park.

We will join this trip by the Miami Blue Chapter of the North American Butterfly Association to seek out butterflies and the plants they visit, led by Park Biologist Elizabeth Golden. It's also an opportunity to enjoy the beautifully restored natural areas, birds and other wildlife. Some might like to stay for lunch at the Boater's Grill, a lighthouse tour or a swim. See www.floridastateparks.org/capeflorida/ for more information.

  • Park Admission: $8 per vehicle (2-8 people), $4 single-occupant vehicle. There is also a $1.75/vehicle causeway toll.
  • Bring/wear: Binoculars (close focus best) if you want to learn to identify the little butterflies; sun protection; lots of water.
  • Difficulty: Walking on paved or smooth paths, may be hot.
  • Background reading: Palmetto, Vol. 31: Number 1, 2014, "The Rebirth of Cape Florida" by Richard Brownscombe, Broward Chapter FNPS president.
  • Lost/late? Try Patty's cell (305-878-5705)